Archive for 2010


Production Killer – Shop Vacs

Kicking off a new series on How To Kill Production

If it involves painting a house and kills production, we’ll cover it. We take a close look at how various shortcomings kill production and offer alternative solutions to maximize efficiency. Let’s face it, paint contractors need shop vacs. They play an important role producing professional finishes but a few things can kill production. The shop vac in the photo is a good shop vac but there are a few things we can do to increase its efficiency on the job. The following features play an important role with production.


If it ain’t broke, let’s break it!

In a roundabout ongoing quest to understand minimal and slow product advancements in our trade, I came to realize certain things need to occur before a new product is born or service is launched.

For as long as I can remember, I’ve lived my life with the mindset of “If it ain’t broke, let’s break it.”


Staining 1200 feet of Knotty Pine

We put 68 man-hours into finishing one side of this knotty pine which will be used in the photo below, outside. That works out to be about 17.6 feet per hour.


Sherwin Williams Exterior Latex Wood Primer

Wait, Whoa, What? Why bother?

After you read the label on the back of this primer you might ask — Why does this product exist? I don’t have the answer but what I do have is something you might want to know if you use it in areas not intended, like a paint contractor did in the photo above on exterior wood with knots.


HOW TO: Rolling Load Distribution

With so many ways to roll paint on walls, which way is the most effective in distributing the load of paint? Let’s take a closer look at the method I prefer and variations of it.

Taking a look at the top (clickable) photo, I drop-in the middle of the wall and move the load of paint up about 29 inches and back down 29 inches below where I dropped in. Next, using the same load, I move back up and stop at the ceiling maintaining the same roller path and finish at the baseboard.